Petrus Kadu, in his 50s, prunes a coffee tree on his farm in the mountainous town of Bajawa, Flores Island, Indonesia.

Keeping Coffee Farming in the Family

Across the developing world, coffee farmers face a dilemma: they’re growing older – the average age of the coffee farmer is over 60 years old – but their children have no interest in taking their place. The younger generation tends to migrate to cities, where they’ll have a better chance at making a living. For […]

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Why Coffee and Cocoa Farmers Face Similar Predicament – and Promise

This article was originally published in the December 2015 issue of CoffeeTalk magazine. Just over a year ago, I left Keurig Green Mountain after almost 27 years, and weeks later accepted a new role with Lutheran World Relief where, in my role as Senior Relationship Manager, Coffee & Cocoa, I continue to work with coffee farmers [...]Read More...

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Why Do Coffee & Cocoa Farmers Struggle So Much? A Q&A with Rick Peyser

Coffee and Cocoa are big business around the world. In the United States alone, coffee is the largest food import, and chocolate generates more than $20 billion per year in revenue. Yet many of the world’s coffee and cocoa producers live in poverty. Rick Peyser, Lutheran World Relief’s senior relationship manager for coffee and cocoa, [...]Read More...

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Cocoa producer Nevardo Gómez prepares organic fertilizer on his plantation located in the community of Nueva Quezada.

Where does your chocolate come from? Meet Nevardo.

Almost 90 percent of the world’s cocoa originates from small-scale farmers (producers who farm less than five hectares, or about 12.4 acres, of land). These farmers face considerable challenges to maximize their yields, including changing weather patterns, disease, aging trees and limited access to improved varieties, inputs and technical assistance. On average, they earn less [...]Read More...

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Lutheran World Relief Receives $350,000 from Starbucks Foundation

We are proud to announce that we have received a Starbucks Foundation grant of $350,000 toward a two-year project that contributes to the protection of the local ecosystem, provides sustainable livelihoods, and fosters community in Colombia: Pro-Café: Protecting Ecosystem Services for Sustainable Coffee Livelihoods. Coffee growers’ livelihoods and quality of life in central Colombia are [...]Read More...

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